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The Suppression of the African Slave-Trade to the United States, 1638-1870

The Suppression of the African Slave Trade to the United States According to William Edward Burghardt Du Bois February August was an American civil rights activist public intellectual Pan Africanist professor of sociology historian writer a

  • Title: The Suppression of the African Slave-Trade to the United States, 1638-1870
  • Author: W.E.B. Du Bois
  • ISBN: 2940000758403
  • Page: 350
  • Format: Nook
  • According to William Edward Burghardt Du Bois February 23, 1868 August 27, 1963 was an American civil rights activist, public intellectual, Pan Africanist, professor of sociology, historian, writer, and editor At the age of 95, in 1963, he became a naturalized citizen of Ghana David Levering Lewis, a biographer, wrote, In the course of his long, turbulenAccording to William Edward Burghardt Du Bois February 23, 1868 August 27, 1963 was an American civil rights activist, public intellectual, Pan Africanist, professor of sociology, historian, writer, and editor At the age of 95, in 1963, he became a naturalized citizen of Ghana David Levering Lewis, a biographer, wrote, In the course of his long, turbulent career, W E B Du Bois attempted virtually every possible solution to the problem of twentieth century racism scholarship, propaganda, integration, national self determination, human rights, cultural and economic separatism, politics, international communism, expatriation, third world solidarity.

    • Free Read [Psychology Book] ✓ The Suppression of the African Slave-Trade to the United States, 1638-1870 - by W.E.B. Du Bois ✓
      350 W.E.B. Du Bois
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      Posted by:W.E.B. Du Bois
      Published :2020-06-20T23:45:42+00:00

    About "W.E.B. Du Bois"

    1. W.E.B. Du Bois

      In 1868, W.E.B Du Bois William Edward Burghardt Du Bois, pronounced doo boyz was born in Massachusetts He attended Fisk College in Nashville, then earned his BA in 1890 and his MS in 1891 from Harvard Du Bois studied at the University of Berlin, then earned his doctorate in history from Harvard in 1894 He taught economics and history at Atlanta University from 1897 1910 The Souls of Black Folk 1903 made his name, in which he urged black Americans to stand up for their educational and economic rights Du Bois was a founder of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, and edited the NAACP s official journal, Crisis, from 1910 to 1934 Du Bois turned Crisis into the foremost black literary journal The black nationalist expanded his interests to global concerns, and is called the father of Pan Africanism for organizing international black congresses.Although he used some religious metaphor and expressions in some of his books and writings, Du Bois called himself a freethinker In On Christianity, a posthumously published essay, Du Bois critiqued the black church The theology of the average colored church is basing itself far too much upon Hell and Damnation upon an attempt to scare people into being decent and threatening them with the terrors of death and punishment We are still trained to believe a good deal that is simply childish in theology The outward and visible punishment of every wrong deed that men do, the repeated declaration that anything can be gotten by anyone at any time by prayer Du Bois became a member of the Communist Party and officially repudiated his U.S citizenship at the end of his life, dying in his adopted country of Ghana D 1963.More britannica EBchecked tpbs wnet jimcrow storibuffalo sww 0his.icaslibrary aa dub

    770 Comments

    1. This was du Bois' PhD thesis at Harvard. It is meticulously researched and footnoted. It covered many things I did not know before and I consider myself informed. The citizens of the northern states were as deeply implicated in the continuation of the slave trade as those in the south who owned slaves. Those with moral qualms were in a minority in all locations. The Federal legislature was as ineffective then as it is now. definitely worth a read.


    2. THIS, ladies and gentlemen, IS American history. It is free online. Get it. "Here was a rich new land, the wealth of which was to be had in return for ordinary manual labor. Had the country been conceived of as existing primarily for the benefit of its actual inhabitants, it might have waited for natural increase or immigration to supply the needed hands; but both Europe and the earlier colonists themselves regarded this land as existing chiefly for the benefit of Europe, and as designed to be e [...]


    3. The 1969 introduction by Norman Klein gives an interesting overview of the strengths, weaknesses, and unique contributions, particularly by raising awareness of then-to-fore undiscussed issues, in DuBois' original thesis. DuBois' own Apologia to his work, written in 1954 (some 60 years after initial publication of his thesis?), is a fascinating read, given his insights into his own early work as a young man, and thoughts on that work, viewed from the distance of those years. Very nice read.The w [...]


    4. Not the easiest book to read but well worth the effort and time. Lots of details that you will not find anywhere else.


    5. W.E.B. DuBois’s PhD dissertation reminds that progress does not move in a linear fashion, particularly in the American context or narrative. The book speaks about the importing and exporting of enslaved Africans by the 13 colonies, later known as the United States. This international trade was deemed to be separate from the institution of slavery WITHIN the United States. With thorough research, DuBois starts with the individual states’ motives (or lack thereof) for slowing or abolishing the [...]


    6. A fascinating look at the slave trade from a perspective far closer than intellectual studies written later. Du Bois is undoubtedly a great writer. The subject is studied with a seemingly dispassionate relating of relevant facts. A good book with which to gain greater understanding (though hardly any sympathy) of the political climate of the age.



    7. The best coverage of the slave trade I've read so far.Perhaps it is the approach, a Sociological view, rather than a history. I found it dispassionate, extremely well researched and specific in scope. All sides of the issue were covered, including the international interests of the time. I haven't found a modern book that has done as good a job. Read it!!!


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