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Fantasy Magazine, October 2014: Women Destroy Fantasy! Special Issue

Fantasy Magazine October Women Destroy Fantasy Special Issue LIGHTSPEED is an online science fiction and fantasy magazine In its pages you will find science fiction from near future sociological soft SF to far future star spanning hard SF and fantasy from e

  • Title: Fantasy Magazine, October 2014: Women Destroy Fantasy! Special Issue
  • Author: Cat Rambo Terri Windling Nalo Hopkinson Delia Sherman Carol Emshwiller Emma Bull T. Kingfisher Kat Howard
  • ISBN: -
  • Page: 339
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • LIGHTSPEED is an online science fiction and fantasy magazine In its pages, you will find science fiction from near future, sociological soft SF, to far future, star spanning hard SF and fantasy from epic fantasy, sword and sorcery, and contemporary urban tales, to magical realism, science fantasy, and folktales Funded as a stretch goal of LIGHTSPEED s Women Destroy SciLIGHTSPEED is an online science fiction and fantasy magazine In its pages, you will find science fiction from near future, sociological soft SF, to far future, star spanning hard SF and fantasy from epic fantasy, sword and sorcery, and contemporary urban tales, to magical realism, science fantasy, and folktales Funded as a stretch goal of LIGHTSPEED s Women Destroy Science Fiction Kickstarter campaign, this month we re presenting a special one off issue of our otherwise discontinued sister magazine, FANTASY, called Women Destroy Fantasy an all fantasy extravaganza entirely written and edited by women Here s what we ve got lined up for you in this special issue Original fantasy edited by long time FANTASY editor Cat Rambo by Kate Hall, H.E Roulo, T Kingfisher, and Julia August Reprints selected by legendary editor Terri Windling by Delia Sherman, Emma Bull, Carol Emshwiller, and Nalo Hopkinson Nonfiction articles edited by LIGHTSPEED managing editor Wendy N Wagner by Kameron Hurley, Galen Dara, Sandra Wickham, Shanna Germain, Sofia Samatar, Kat Howard, and Wendy N Wagner Plus an original cover illustration by Elizabeth Leggett.

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      339 Cat Rambo Terri Windling Nalo Hopkinson Delia Sherman Carol Emshwiller Emma Bull T. Kingfisher Kat Howard
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      Posted by:Cat Rambo Terri Windling Nalo Hopkinson Delia Sherman Carol Emshwiller Emma Bull T. Kingfisher Kat Howard
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    About "Cat Rambo Terri Windling Nalo Hopkinson Delia Sherman Carol Emshwiller Emma Bull T. Kingfisher Kat Howard"

    1. Cat Rambo Terri Windling Nalo Hopkinson Delia Sherman Carol Emshwiller Emma Bull T. Kingfisher Kat Howard

      FSF writer Cat Rambo lives and writes in the Pacific Northwest Her short story collection, EYES LIKE SKY AND COAL AND MOONLIGHT, was a 2010 Endeavor Award finalist A third collection, NEAR FAR, appeared in 2012 from Hydra House She has been shortlisted for an Endeavour Award, Locus Award, World Fantasy Award and most recently the Nebula Award Her debut novel, BEASTS OF TABAT, appeared in 2015 from WordFire Press, the same year she co edited AD ASTRA THE SFWA 50TH ANNIVERSARY COOKBOOK In 2016, forthcoming books include HEARTS OF TABAT novel and NEITHER HERE NOR THERE collection She is the current President of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America SFWA.If you would like to sign up to receive stories from her each month, check out her Patreon campaign at patreon catrambo

    390 Comments

    1. I relished the destruction here more than in its queer counterpart. ;)I may try more of:- Carol Emshwiller and Delia Sherman, for capturing the universality of sentient experience and our need to communicate--however different forms we may take- Tina Connoly's Silverblind, for bringing another hard-nosed (albeit curly-cute) heroine to the fieldI'll be watching for:- T. Kingfisher / Ursula Vernon, a mighty modern magician: she can turn a classical fairytale into a classy examination of the sterot [...]


    2. Read: The Glass Bottle Trick by Nalo Hopkinson5/5 Stars. A Bluebeard re-telling set in the Caribbean. I loved this one. It holds true to the original story, but feels like a completely original work. I instantly put the author on my priority-reads list after I finished to find more of her work.


    3. The October 2014 issue of Fantasy magazine brings the retired periodical back for a special issue in the "Women Destroy" series (see also Women Destroy Science Fiction and Women Destroy Horror, all which celebrate women's contributions to said genres). The result is a really strong collection of original and reprinted fiction, plus some insightful author interviews and nonfiction pieces. Only one of the short stories didn't work for me, but the rest were great. Here's a break down of my favorite [...]


    4. Should have been much longer and had much more original fiction (or reprint fiction! more fiction is the important thing). The short essays/interviews were okay, but not reasons to pick up the magazine.Re: the original fiction, Ursula Vernon's 'The Dryad's Shoe' was exactly the kind of Cinderella retelling I would have loved as a kid/still love (I need to read her books/short fiction!), Kate Hall's story was a bit obvious but ok, I wasn't sure what to make of Julia August's 'Drowning in the Sky' [...]


    5. Fantasy Magazine was folded into Lightspeed Magazine in 2012, but it came out of retirement in October 2014 for the Women Destroy Fantasy issue, one of the stretch goals of a Kickstarter for an all-women edition of Lightspeed. I was one of the contributors to the Kickstarter, and, as my review last week revealed, I greatly enjoyed the Women Destroy Horror issue of Nightmare Magazine that was another stretch goal of the same Kickstarter. I’m pleased to report that the fantasy issue is just as [...]


    6. Great stories with many surprises. The "fantasy" genre hasn't been particularly appealing to me lately (since college, really). Occasional exceptions (China Miéville, George R.R. Martin) only underscored the fact that most fantasy stories were schlocky derivatives. This collection, however, casts doubt on that presumption and has rekindled my interest in the genre. These stories were all over the map: superheroes, Greek myths, Sasquatch, Bluebeard, mermen, and the best, most badass Cinderella I [...]


    7. When Fantasy Magazine closed and became enfolded into Lightspeed Magazine, the science fiction and fantasy and content of the merged product divided fairly equitably. I therefore found it disappointing that Women Destroy SF was so much larger than this, effectively making it impossible to cover anywhere near all major branches (styles) of fantasy here. But for the content that is included it is a good varied showing of excellent stories old and new. The nonfiction pieces in here are particularly [...]


    8. Another solid collection of fantasy stories from the Women Destroy! series. I read the SF one before this.This volume does not have as many stories as the SF. But the few stories and reprints here are very meaty, and much longer. Each one had such a fully realized and well thought out world, I was completely lost in it. I was sad when the stories were done!The interviews and non fiction essays were excellent. The one that really caught my attention was the interview with all of the artists, whic [...]


    9. These types of anthologies expose me to so many great women writers of fantasy, and I really really wish some of them created full-length works. T Kingfisher, Delia Sherman, Emma Bull (fellow Minneapolitan!) stood out to be as truly fantastic, but it appears Kingfisher is the only one actively writing in adult fiction fantasy, Sherman's and Bull's novels are years old. This anthology also has transcriptions of conversations about gender and fantasy among women and fantasy illustrators to get the [...]


    10. I absolutely love the premise and organization behind this anthology, but I'm less enthusiastic about the actual curation. While a couple of stories were very strong, a lot of the choices felt a little obvious for a collection with destroy in the title. They subverted, but in ways common enough as to be almost tropes themselves. I think I was expecting something that pushed a bit farther, but it was a pleasant addition to a few evenings all the same. I'm looking forward to the other special issu [...]


    11. A companion volume to the SF collection, but only about half the size (producing this was the result of meeting a stretch goal in the original fundraiser). Several good stories, but overall not as strong a collection as the SF one, however did contain a section recommending authors and books to read - I'll be referring back to this later (not that my to-read list needs encouragement!). 3 1/2 stars, rounded up.


    12. An equal blend of old and new short stories and old and new essays, this was a real treat to read. It made me seriously consider getting a genre magazine subscription, as looking at the included art on my kindle was just downright sad. Probably my favorite story from this issue was a Cinderella retelling, "The Dryad's Shoe" with a delightful twist. It also contained the first chapter of "Silverblind" which hooked me.


    13. 3/5. Positive: My favourite story was The Dryad's Shoe, which was a clever take on classic fairytale plotlines. Other favourites included The Scrimshaw and the Scream, Making the Cut, Miss Carstairs and the Merman, Silver or Gold, and The Abominable Child's Tale. Negative: I found Drowning in Sky to be very confusing to read, even if it was beautifully written.


    14. The story about the merman was my favorite. The style of fantasy horror where the reader knows what the character has found is bizarre and alien, but the character thinks it's just something new, is always good fun.


    15. I am really sad this ended. I thoroughly enjoyed the stories, though would have liked me of them, as well as the interviews and transcribed panel discussions. It certainly has given me more great authors to look up.


    16. I'm having a hard time with short-stories anthologies."The dryads' shoe" was greate rest were nice. 1-2 I really didn't like.Some of the "articles" were inspiring.The round table and interviews I skipped.That's all I have to say about this one.


    17. 4.5 stars. A nice collection of fantasy stories written by women and with women in lead roles, plus dome analysis of the role of women in the fantasy genre. I'm also excited by the list of new books and authors to read.I'll come back with some additional notes about my favorite stories.


    18. I will admit I didn't read the interviews, but I loved the short stories and the other articles. It was nice to read about women who were not merely part of a romance. The characters all had a nice depth for me.



    19. I really love the selection of stories and the mini-bios of the authors. All of the stories were excellent and I'm happy to have found so many great new writers.


    20. Didn't pack quite the same punch as Women Destroy Science Fiction, but still a nice selection of original stories and essays.



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